Community Protection For Crime aka Emeshed Dysfunction
April 24, 2015

In towns, communities, neighborhoods, schools and homes throughout America, criminals feel safe from being caught, turned in and even being looked down upon by the citizens they see and talk with daily.  Imagine living somewhere knowing who the drug dealers are, who stole someones car, who broke into someones home, who mugged a child or adult just out for a walk, who shot up a playground, who murdered someone, who raped someone, etc. and there is no public outrage.  Imagine living somewhere and the community refuses to march in protest and demand the criminals be given over to the authorities.  Imagine living somewhere and the community refuses to hold candlelight visuals and cry in the streets in front of known crack houses and street hangouts where criminals congregate.

Throughout urban America the above senario plays almost daily sadly without voices of righteous indignation.  Throughout urban America criminals have concluded that as long as they confine their criminal behaviors upon others within the urban grid they are safe from community protest and accountability.  Throughout urban America is the unwritten message becoming one that says as long as crime is committed by those who look like us we are not bothered?  Throughout urban America is the unwritten message becoming one that says as long as our children are in fear of those who terrorize, demoralize, show self hate, show no respect for others in our community look like us we are not bothered?

Healthy Boundaries Prevent Emotional Abuse

Clinically the term emeshement refers to a family that has little to no boundaries defining acceptable and unacceptable behaviors, actions and attitudes.  Inside an emeshed family system, each individual has a designated dysfunctional role.  Within an emeshed family, dysfunction is tolerated within the immediate family but if similar behaviors, actions and attitudes manifests from any outside source the emeshed family rallies together and fight as one unit against any resembling acts coming from outside the family.  After the emeshed dysfunctional family successfully or unsuccessfully fights against outsiders they return to their regular practice of being dysfunctional toward each other.  Until dysfunctional communities address themselves internally, any efforts by outsiders will possibly be viewed as an attack.  If in fact there is such a thing as a dysfunctional community, how should the community begin addressing itself internally?